Taxes

Year-end and year-start are key periods for financial and tax planning if you have stock options and restricted stock units (RSUs), participate in an employee stock purchase plan (ESPP), and/or hold company shares. In 2022, year-end planning can be tricky because of the market downturn, volatile stock prices, and job uncertainty. A December webinar held
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Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Linkedin What are some good dividend stocks to buy? The right answer depends on your financial goals. With dividend stocks, there’s usually a trade-off between yield and reliability. Said another way, the dividend-payers that generate maximum income for your investment dollar aren’t always the most dependable. And
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This time of year, “pay me next year” requests are common with employers, suppliers, vendors, customers and more. On a cash basis, you probably assume you can’t be taxed until you receive money. But technically, if you have a legal right to payment but decide not to receive it, the IRS can tax you nonetheless.
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In the first of a three-episode series, Steven Wlodychak, formerly with EY, discusses the creation of the SALT cap deduction by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and how states addressed it and other changes. This transcript has been edited for length and clarity. David D. Stewart: Welcome to the podcast. I’m David Stewart, editor
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In any normal year, an accounting or tax firm is a combination financial expert, compliance high-wire walker, strategist, strategic genius, therapist, and factotum extraordinaire. This is not a normal year. Coming in from the heights are the pandemic and ongoing supply chain issues, labor shortages, tax changes still to be seen from the 2017 code
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Tenth Circuit upholding the Tax Court’s ruling in the case of Preston Olsen may signal the revival of a once successful IRS technique for attacking tax shelters. Code Section 183 – Activities not engaged in for profit – is commonly rereferred to as the “hobby loss” rule. That is reasonable in that it seems that
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Back in 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice announced it was hitting Deutsche Bank with a $14 billion fine relating to its dealings in mortgage-backed securities. The irregularities occurred years earlier, during the buildup to the 2008 financial crisis. Around the same time, the European Commission announced it was hitting Apple (indirectly) with a tax
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Today’s Social Security column addresses questions about the whether working before filing can incur the earnings test, full retirement age for survivor’s benefits versus retirement benefits and more about widow’s benefits. Larry Kotlikoff is a Professor of Economics at Boston University and the founder and president of Economic Security Planning, Inc. Will Working Before My
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Tax Notes contributing editors Robert Goulder and Joseph J. Thorndike consider the historical context of why the IRS Criminal Investigation division carries guns. This transcript has been edited for length and clarity. Robert Goulder: This past summer Congress passed the Inflation Reduction Act (P.L. 117-169), which boosted IRS funding to the tune of $80 billion
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In Notice 2022-58, 2022-47 IRB 483, the IRS and Treasury asked, “Should indirect book accounting factors that reduce a taxpayer’s effective greenhouse gas emissions (also known as a book and claim system), including, but not limited to, renewable energy credits, power purchase agreements, renewable thermal credits, or biogas credits be considered when calculating the section
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Tax Notes chief correspondent Stephanie Soong discusses how countries are approaching implementation of the OECD’s two-pillar corporate tax reform plan and the future of the OECD after Pascal Saint-Amans’s departure. This transcript has been edited for length and clarity. David D. Stewart: Welcome to the podcast. I’m David Stewart, editor in chief of Tax Notes
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Working from home (WFH) has taken a big jump after the Covid-19 pandemic, and some very smart people think it’s here to stay (as I reviewed in my last blog), because many highly educated workers like it. But others aren’t so sure whether employers will continue supporting it, especially if the economy softens and labor
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In July Indian Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman issued a clarion call to her G-20 counterparts, urging them to devise a way to automatically exchange information on cryptoassets, much as they do with traditional financial accounts. The Indian government has long been wary of cryptoassets and their attendant tax evasion risks. Although the country won’t legally
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Donating appreciated stock to charity can be a great way to give back and reduce your tax bill. Taxpayers who itemize get a tax deduction for the market value of the stock. Unlike regular stock sales, when giving stock, there’s no capital gain. The charity receives the full value of the stock (usually in cash).
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The COVID-19 pandemic-induced push into working from home (WFH) now seems to be a permanent part of the labor market, according to some experts. But others think business cycles and employer needs may eventually push more people back into the office. While WFH is clearly important now, it could change, given the divergent interests of
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