Retirement

Today’s column addresses questions about how taking early retirement benefits would affect survivor’s benefits taken later, when spousal benefits can be available and how divorced spousal benefits are calculated. Larry Kotlikoff is a Professor of Economics at Boston University and the founder and president of Economic Security Planning, Inc, which markets Maximize My Social Security
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If you’re near retirement, there’s a good chance you are in active information-gathering mode, combing the Wild West of the internet for the best advice on how to prepare yourself for such a huge life transition. And there is great information available. You can find endless commentary on things like Roth conversion strategies, investment allocation,
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A guide to understanding the relationship between trustee and beneficiary A trust is an arrangement whereby one person (the grantor) places property in the care of another (the trustee) for the benefit of a third (the beneficiary) for the purposes and under the terms described by the grantor. Trusts are often created for the long
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Today’s column addresses questions about how taking Social Security retirement benefits at 62 might affect spousal and survivor’s benefits, what spousal benefits can be available after a divorce and withdrawing Social Security disability benefits. Larry Kotlikoff is a Professor of Economics at Boston University and the founder and president of Economic Security Planning, Inc, which
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Today’s column addresses questions about ‘switching’ from a retirement benefit to a spousal benefit, filing retroactively and then immediately suspending and what benefits might be available on records of ex spouses. Larry Kotlikoff is a Professor of Economics at Boston University and the founder and president of Economic Security Planning, Inc, which markets Maximize My
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President Biden’s $400 billion plan to expand Medicaid’s home and community based services (HCBS) for people receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS) already has accomplished one major goal: It has policymakers and opinion leaders talking about how we care for frail older adults and younger people with disabilities. We not had a long-term care conversation
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By Chris Farrell, Next Avenue You’ve probably been hearing about how the Biden administration wants to raise the 21% corporate tax rate and the 37% top income tax rate and 20% capital gains rate for the wealthiest Americans. But changes in the estate tax rules, under consideration by the president and Congress, haven’t received as much
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For decades, the conservative story of trickle-down economics—including, particularly tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations, cutting funding for the common good, and deregulation to promote corporate profits at the expense of workers—, was all the rage. Supposedly, it would create much faster growth. Yet massive inequality amid sluggish growth has proven this argument wrong.
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By Beau Henderson, Next Avenue If the idea of starting a business after 50 — perhaps a part-time one in retirement — seems overwhelming, you’re not alone. You might want to consider launching through a successful franchise operation, where you can follow in the footsteps of others who’ve done so already. Eric and Pam Knauss launched
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By Craig Miller, Next Avenue The last few hurricane seasons have been white-knuckle events for Reed Galin, which might seem odd since the 67-year-old media producer lives just outside Nashville. Not exactly “Hurricane Alley.” Galin’s concern was for his parents, both living at the time in Juno Beach, Fla. His father, Sherman, was a particular worry;
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